Items filtered by date: November 2023

Tuesday, 28 November 2023 00:00

Surgery for an Achilles Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon plays an essential role in your daily movements, facilitating activities like running, jumping, and even just walking. This tendon connects the heel bones to the calf muscles, allowing you to lift your heels and push up on your toes with ease. However, when faced with a ruptured or torn Achilles tendon, surgical intervention may be necessary to restore functionality and reduce the risk of re-rupture. An Achilles tendon rupture can occur during activities that involve sudden, forceful movements, or it may happen from chronic wear and tear. After such an injury, surgical options are required to reattach the torn ends of the tendon. The two primary options are open surgery and percutaneous surgery. Open surgery involves a single large incision at the back of the leg, while percutaneous surgery utilizes several smaller incisions. Surgeons may opt to wait a week post- injury to allow swelling to decrease before proceeding with either approach. In both cases, the surgeon sews the tendon back together through the incisions. Rehabilitation from Achilles tendon surgery is likely to take between six and nine months. For more information about managing an Achilles tendon rupture, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of PA Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Allentown, Easton, Northampton, and Chew Street in Allentown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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If you have ever experienced the discomfort of foot pain that strikes at night, you are not alone. This phenomenon can be both puzzling and distressing, disrupting precious sleep. There are several potential reasons why your feet can ache during the nighttime hours. One common cause of nighttime foot pain is plantar fasciitis, a condition that involves inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot. This inflammation can become more pronounced when you rest, leading to pain when you try to sleep. Another possible culprit is neuropathy, a condition characterized by nerve damage. Neuropathy can cause tingling, burning, and sharp pains in the feet, often worsening at night. Diabetes and other underlying medical conditions can contribute to the development of neuropathy. Restless Leg Syndrome, or RLS, is yet another contributor to nocturnal foot pain. Those with RLS experience an irresistible urge to move their legs, often accompanied by uncomfortable sensations like tingling or aching in the feet. This can disrupt sleep and lead to foot discomfort. Ii you are experiencing nighttime foot pain, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist, who can identify the underlying cause and offer appropriate treatment methods.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from PA Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Allentown, Easton, Northampton, and Chew Street in Allentown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 20 November 2023 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 14 November 2023 00:00

Treatment of Sesamoiditis

There are two sesamoid bones located beneath the big toe which aid its movement. Problems with these sesamoid bones can vary from acute injuries such as turf toe, where the toe excessively bends due to fractures. Pain may also arise from sesamoiditis, an inflammation of the sesamoids, or from arthritis affecting the toe. Symptoms of acute sesamoid issues can manifest as intense pain and difficulty in walking, while chronic conditions may cause persistent pain under the big toe, which can be aggravated by certain shoes or activities, hinting at sesamoiditis. Diagnosis typically involves examining the patient's medical history and symptoms, supported by X-rays or more detailed scans such as an MRI or CT scan. Treatment strategies for sesamoid problems range from wearing supportive footwear and activity modifications. If these measures fail, surgery might be considered, which could include removing the sesamoid bones or repairing them. If you have foot pain of any sort, it is strongly suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose the problem and offer treatment options that can help you return to normal activity levels.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact one of our podiatrists of PA Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Allentown, Easton, Northampton, and Chew Street in Allentown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 07 November 2023 00:00

Managing Intoeing in Children's Feet

One foot condition parents may encounter in their child’s feet is known as metatarsus adductus, recognizable when a child's foot looks like it's forming a C shape. Known by other names, such as metatarsus varus or pes adductus, it is a condition your child might have from birth. The front part of the foot, or the forefoot, points inward toward the back part of the foot. This makes the inside edge of the foot look curved and the outside edge look more rounded. Metatarsus adductus can be confused with other foot problems like skewfoot, which has a bump on the outside edge, or clubfoot, where the whole foot is turned inwards and down. Sometimes, this condition fixes itself as your child grows, but regular check-ups with a podiatrist are essential for monitoring progress. This medically trained foot doctor can suggest simple stretching exercises to help the foot align correctly. In addition, your podiatrist can prescribe custom shoe inserts for extra support and help correct the foot's shape. In more severe cases, your child's foot might be gently cast to guide it into the right position. Surgery may be suggested in extreme cases. With the right care and guidance, your child can have happy, healthy feet. If your child exhibits intoeing, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist for a complete examination and a treatment plan.

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of PA Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Allentown, Easton, Northampton, and Chew Street in Allentown, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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